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Cherry

Cherry

Cherry (Prunusserotina)

Cherry wood is one of the popular hardwood choices for residential furniture, especially for flooring, cabinets, doors, etc. 

The Appalachian region of the United States produces beautiful Cherry wood.
The warm red tone and subtle grain pattern of Cherry make it an excellent interior wood for doors, windows, moldings and especially furniture. American Cherry hardwood comes in a diverse range of tones. An most people love its as it turns redder with age. 

The predictable movement of properly dried Cherry and the ease with which it can be worked have made the species a staple material in many craftsmen’s projects.

People love Cherry for its color, but rough sawn Cherry lumber is a much lighter pink than what most expect. Many Cherry finishes are much deeper browns and reds, and this can cause some confusion. 

Over time and with UV exposure and oxidation, Cherry wood’s color deepens into a beautiful brownish-red, although freshly sawn cherry may not display the specie’s famous colors, rest assured that it eventually will. Many customers choose to expose their Cherry to the sun to speed up this process, while others rely upon dye and/or stains to achieve the deep red color. This “break in” period is something of which everyone should be aware, especially when doing restoration work to match existing trim or furniture.

Furniture manufacturesrs and makers love its smooth, straight, and easy to work wod grain attributes. Cherry wood is very durable, highly resistant to decay and highly customizable. We see natural cherry wood as an environmentally responsible hardwood alternative to mahogany, teak, and other tropical rainforest woods. 

Color/Appearance : Heartwood is a light pinkish brown when freshly cut, darkening to a deeper golden brown with time and upon exposure to light. Sapwood is a pale yellowish color.

Grain/Texture : Has a fine texture with close grain. The grain is usually straight and easy to work—with the exception of figured pieces with curly grain patterns.

Rot Resistance : Has a fine texture with close grain. The grain is usually straight and easy to work—with the exception of figured pieces with curly grain patterns.

Workability : Cherry is known as being one of the best all-around woods for workability. It is stable, straight-grained, and machines well. The only difficulties typically arise if the wood is being stained, as it can sometimes give blotchy results due to its fine, closed pores.

Pricing/Availability : Prices are typically cost more than oak or maple, usually little lower to the price of walnut.

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